Saturday, February 18, 2012

Multi-Plot Blacktop: Road to Nowhere (2010)*****

Reviewed by Shu Zin


Monte Hellman's ROAD TO NOWHERE is an elegant, original, movie that will thrill lovers of great technique who can stand being led somewhat by the nose. It is important to watch this film with your mind fully engaged. In addition to being a movie within a movie, it is a plot within a plot…within a plot; in the end, everything comes together in a totally surprising revelation. 


The story is about a young director making a film about a real event that took place in the Smokey Mountains in North Carolina, involving a politician, his young mistress, a plane crash and a big hunk of money gone missing. As the making of the film progresses, reality begins to blend with and change the story. Halfway through, you may find yourself questioning which is which, but the elliptical structure will ultimately reward you with understanding and a sense of continuity, no matter how elusive they seem earlier in the film.


First rate cast and direction, and the cinematography is stupendous, with beautiful, lush exteriors and a colonial looking hotel, dramatically lit and softly colored, with a lot of long, slow shots. This is a movie that invites you to luxuriate in its sheer beauty while seducing you into its magic. An absolute must see for movie lovers with patience and an interest in the craft.


 Reviewed by Shu Zin

Multi-Plot Blacktop: Road to Nowhere (2010)*****

Reviewed by Shu Zin


Monte Hellman's ROAD TO NOWHERE is an elegant, original, movie that will thrill lovers of great technique who can stand being led somewhat by the nose. It is important to watch this film with your mind fully engaged. In addition to being a movie within a movie, it is a plot within a plot…within a plot; in the end, everything comes together in a totally surprising revelation. 


The story is about a young director making a film about a real event that took place in the Smokey Mountains in North Carolina, involving a politician, his young mistress, a plane crash and a big hunk of money gone missing. As the making of the film progresses, reality begins to blend with and change the story. Halfway through, you may find yourself questioning which is which, but the elliptical structure will ultimately reward you with understanding and a sense of continuity, no matter how elusive they seem earlier in the film.


First rate cast and direction, and the cinematography is stupendous, with beautiful, lush exteriors and a colonial looking hotel, dramatically lit and softly colored, with a lot of long, slow shots. This is a movie that invites you to luxuriate in its sheer beauty while seducing you into its magic. An absolute must see for movie lovers with patience and an interest in the craft.


 Reviewed by Shu Zin

10 Years of The Savages

The Savages struck a vibrant chord with me when it was first released 10 years ago. It’s all about a pair of 40-ish siblings...